Updates, Apologies, TMI, & Ramblings on Happy Endings

Really, the subject covers it all. Obviously you see updates haven’t been happening. I am sorry about that. Please accept my apologies. One reason is … well, general illness. I spent the majority of today just trying not to throw up. (There’s the TMI).

Now for the rambling. Have I ever mentioned that while I read romance exclusively, my other entertainment aspects are more varied? In fact, I don’t like the “romance movies” or “romantic comedies” generally. The sweeping romantic dramas. Generally? Bleh. I love … psychological thrillers. My new show glom is Hannibal.

But, what I want to know is – how do you feel about happy endings? As in – how far must they go, and how much do you demand them?

I have to say – I do. Definitively. I absolutely do not like “happy for now” and would argue that’s not even truly a romance novel. Romances have happily ever after. Does the author have to show it? Well, no. Not necessarily, and I get that it wouldn’t always work. I don’t want forced scenes, rushed or pat endings either. (You see I’m not a very demanding reader at all ;)) What I don’t want to read is the hero and heroine hooking up and being happy – with no true relational background or build up. If they’re just in the flush of ‘hey let’s spend some time together” instead of “I really think this is real and will last.”

In fact, a great story will pretty much be ruined in my estimation with a HFN ending.

What about you?

12 thoughts on “Updates, Apologies, TMI, & Ramblings on Happy Endings

  1. Melody May

    Lime, I’m with you on the HFN. I can’t stand it. More and more authors are doing it. I get it that they want to build a series. However, I just want to scream “WHY YOU COULD HAVE LEFT THEM ALONE?” I’m to the point that I I’ll checkout to see how the series continues and decide from that point if I want to continue. Why can’t people just leave it at HEA.

    Reply
    1. Limecello Post author

      Melody – THIS!!! *clings* I mean, why bother if it’s just HFN? And why series bait? (Well, I know why. Money. They’re doing it to get more of our money. But in my case, it makes me want to give them NONE. >:()

      Reply
  2. ki pha

    Hi ya Limecello! All’s good with us here.
    If you don’t like watching romances and love thrillers then have you seen Bates Motel? Now that show is really a thriller for me! I haven’t watched a full episode of Hannibal though.

    As for HEA, I do like it to show that the couple got married or at least heading in that direction (for NAs). I also love epilogues, I at least get to know how my couples are doing months or even years into their future.

    Reply
    1. Limecello Post author

      Ki pha – I have not watched Bates Motel! Other people have thought I did … I dunno if I should check it out. The funny thing is I’m a total pansy and couldn’t watch ANYTHING horror until ~recently/only American Horror Story – and the last 2 seasons weren’t even horror really… And Hannibal to me is much more/only psychological thriller.

      I like epilogues too! I know some people hate them – but you know, to each her own. … >.> Other than allowing for HFN πŸ˜‰

      Reply
  3. ellaquinnauthor

    I don’t like HFN endings either. There doesn’t seem to be a point to them. I love romantic comedies, but strangely, the only romance books I read are historical. Other than that, it’s action, spy types of books.

    Reply
    1. Limecello Post author

      Ella, we’re almost the opposite when it comes to books/movies ;D
      And – I agree. HFN used to be just… a let down. These days they seem to be series bait. πŸ™ Not really a trend I’m loving. At all.

      Reply
  4. denise

    definitely want HEA v. HFN. Romance is my favorite genre. Historical or contemporary.

    may you have healthier days soon!

    Reply
    1. Limecello Post author

      Thanks Denise! Fingers crossed!

      As for subgenres… πŸ˜€ You know I used to read historical romances exclusively? Only when I exhausted my library’s collection way back when did I branch out to contemporaries – and that was when Brava titles were huge.

      Reply
  5. TymberDalton

    LOVE LOVE LOVE Hannibal.

    I read a wide variety of genres. To me, it’s more important to have an ending that works for the particular story. “On the Beach” is a classic (nuclear holocaust aftermath) I just read a couple of months ago. Would I have preferred a “happier” ending? Yes. But it wouldn’t have worked for that book/story. Ditto “Johnny Got His Gun,” another classic I just recently read for the first time.

    I get totally cheesed off if I feel an ending was created by the author just to get an HEA rather than the organic aftermath of the story and characters coming together. Do I wish all books could have a HEA ending? It’d be nice, but the stories themselves would be different. I remember a couple of years back, people got really pissed off at MaryJanice Davidson for something she wrote in one of her books (no spoilers so I won’t detail). As a reader, I wish the story and characters had taken her in a different direction, but I got it and understood why she did it. Had she written it differently, it might have become a totally different story that might not have worked as well as it did. Damned if she did, damned if she didn’t.

    “The Stand” is another one. I wish like hell King had ended it differently than he did in terms of some of the characters, but that’s where their story took him. *shrugs*

    I understand why some readers demand HEA in their books. I really do, and I respect that. But I also recognize sometimes a story has to be told the way the characters are telling it to the author as it’s being written (since I’ve been there myself), so I’m okay when a book doesn’t have one.

    Reply
    1. Limecello Post author

      Tymber, heh, I loathed On the Beach – absolutely hated. In fact I literally threw it against the wall. Numerous times. Granted I was 15 – so maybe that had something to do with it? But… yeah. Did not like. πŸ˜›

      I don’t mind when books that AREN’T romances don’t have a happy ending – but I don’t usually read them. E.g. Interpreter of Maladies (liked it), and The Davinci Code before it was big, and it was … good but then the hype made me hate it.

      So … I think we’re talking two different things? I don’t demand HEA in books across the board – but in romances? Yes. I mean … it’s supposed to be a romance. Q.E.D.

      I do get when things happen/are written not as I’d prefer – and that’s why some books are ZOMG FAVORITES to people but the same book can be a total DNF for others. πŸ™‚

      Reply
  6. sharonchalk

    To be the fact that they are romance novels,just by there genre should have a happy ending and I prefer HEA than HFN.I did see where one author actually said ahead of time that the book did not have a happy ending so if you were expecting one,don’t buy the book,I respected that and even though she gets kudo’s for the honesty,I did not buy the book.A book that is not going to be a happy ending should not be classified in the romance section,it should be in women’s literature instead.And like you,Im not big on romantic comedies,one movie I did like that was a romance was PS I Love you and the Notebook but they are exceptions,I prefer action and scifi movies as they provide me an escape from my world which is what books do although I have heard a lot of friends rave about 12 years a slave which is a drama but on the positive side Brad Pitt is a good guy in it LOL

    Reply
    1. Limecello Post author

      Sharon – exactly! Romance = happy ending! I mean it’s like… a basic tenet of the genre!
      And ooo nice to be warned – I appreciate that. And maybe I would even like the book if I didn’t read it as a romance.

      I haven’t seen P.S. I Love You or The Notebook – and I don’t think I’ll be seeing either >.>

      I do want to watch 12 Years a Slave … at some point … but I know it’ll depress me like crazy :\ Like Hotel Rwanda? I didn’t watch it for years. And anytime I see it – I still cry.

      Reply

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